Package - Andaman (3 Nights & 4 Days)

Package - Andaman (3 Nights & 4 Days)

Market Price
Rs.14,338
Discount
20%
Destination
Destinations: 
Rs.12,044
DEAL CLOSED

Overview

The Andaman and Nicobar Islands were shrouded in mystery for centuries because of their inaccessibility. These are the paragon of beauty and present a landscape full with scenic and picturesque extravaganza. These islands shimmer like emeralds in the Bay of Bengal. The dense forest which cover these islands and the innumerable exotic flowers and birds create a highly poetic and romantic atmosphere. "Here the white beaches on the edge of a meandering coastline have palm trees that sway to the rhythm of the Sea.The Andaman and Nicobar Islands have great maritime importance. During the British period political leaders considered dangerous to the interests of the Raj and other dreaded criminals were deported from mainland to the Cellular Jail- the Indian Bastille, situated on the sea coast of Atlanta Point in the North-Eastern part of Port Blair. Thus these islands were infamously known as the 'Black Water Prison' or 'Kala Pani'. The Andaman & Nicobar are a group of picturesque Islands, big and small, inhabited and uninhabited, a total of 572 islands, islets and rocks lying in the South Eastern Part of the Bay of Bengal.They lie along an arc in long and narrow broken chain, approximately North-South over a distance nearly 800 kms. . It is logical to presume a former land connection form Cape Negris at South part of Burma to Achin Head (Cape Pedro) in Andalas (Sumatra). The flora and fauna of these islands, however, indicate that this land connection if it existed, should have been prior to the development of their present life.
 
Inclusions
Accomodation in A/C Standard Room where category not mentioned.
Daily Buffet Breakfast.
Sightseeing by 1 NON A/C Maruti Van Car.
All Tickets, Permits and Ferry charges in Port Blair, except Camera Charges.
All applicable taxes
 
Itinerary :
Day 1 : Arrival Andaman’s 
Arrival to Port Blair. Get assistance and check into your hotel. After lunch in hotel enjoy Harbour Cruise (Viper Island). Harbour Cruise is a leisurely cruise (for 2 hours) in a steamer along the sea encircling Port Blair, which also takes one to Viper Island - the first place of penal settlement in Andaman’s during British rule. In the evening enjoy the spectacular Sound & Light Show at Cellular Jail. Sound and Light Show - is an hour show held inside the cellular jail, where the heroic saga of the Indian freedom struggle is brought alive. 
Meals: N.A
 
Day 2 : Andaman’s 
Today, after breakfast drive to Coral Island to indulge in underwater life. North Bay (Coral Island) - a full day excursion to see coral reefs, exotic varieties of beautiful ornamental fish and other marine life. Also includes a glass bottomed boat ride. Options available for snorkelling and jungle treks at a supplementary cost. Afternoon trip to Ross Island. ( Closed Wednesdays ) Ross Island - is the place from where the British governed the entire Andaman and Nicobar lslands, prior to India's Independence. This island is an ideal destination for nature walks amidst sylvan surroundings with deers, peacocks, exotic birds, etc. 
Meals: Breakfast
 
Day 3 : Andaman’s 
After breakfast enjoy city tour of Port Blair. ( Closed Mondays ) Port Blair (City Tour) - covers the famous Cellular Jail, Chatham Saw Mill (one of the oldest and largest in Asia), Forest Museum, Mini Zoo, Fisheries (Marine) Museum, Naval Marine Museum (Samudrika), Andaman, Gandhi Park & the Cottage Industries Emporium (Sagarika) - for shopping & souvenirs. 
Meals: Breakfast
 
Day 4 : Departure
Departure for Chennai / Kolkatta/Delhi/Bombay 
Meals: Breakfast
Andaman and Nicobar are a large group of nearly 600 islands in the Bay of Bengal. Though they are a part of India politically, they are closer to Myanmar and Thailand than to the Indian mainland. They are grouped here with Southern India. They were just north of the epicenter of the Boxing Day quake of 2004, and were the site of dozens of aftershocks. The Nicobars were badly hit the by the resulting tsunami, while the Andamans escaped with a few bruises. With the exception of Little Andaman Island and the Mahatma Gandhi Marine National Park, the rest of the tourist destinations are operating normally again.
 
 
Havelock Island, the most visited of the islands, with the most (although still minimal) infrastructure. Beautiful beaches, great snorkeling and scuba diving.
Rutland Island, is pristine, non-polluted and least visited island. Beautiful Mangrove forest and coral reefs welcomes you to the 274 sq.km island. There is also a 45 acre Totani Resort which has quaint little huts which can be used as a base camp for exploring the island. It is the ideal place for eco-tourists.
Totani Resort
Neil Island, quieter than Havelock with nice beaches and decent snorkeling.
Wandoor, a relaxed destination in it's own right, but known more as the gateway to the Mahatma Gandhi Marine National Park.There is a newly setup luxury resort called Sea Princess Beach Resort. Easily reached, and near the Wandoor jetty is Anugama Resort, the newest property there.
Baratang Island, Mud volcano, Limestone caves, and Mangrove creeks in back waters.
Barren Island, an island with the only volcano in all of India.
Long Island, great if you're looking for Robinson Crusoe style camping. Nothing exists here, so you must bring all of your own gear and food.
Little Andaman, once popular for surfing, it was devastated in the 2004 tsunami. Ask around in Port Blair to find out the current situation.
 
 
The islands exist in India's popular consciousness mainly because they were used as a penal colony by the British rulers to imprison rebels and freedom fighters, in addition to hardened criminals. Most of the inhabitants of these islands are in fact migrants from the mainland, some of them descended from the prisoners.During World War II, the Andamans were the only part of India briefly occupied by the Japanese. While notionally handed over to Subhash Chandra Bose's Free India, in practice the Japanese held the reins of power. The territory was run brutally — suspected resistance members were tortured and executed, and when food started to run out towards the end of the war, people were deported to uninhabited islands to fend for themselves as best they could.
 
 
Mid-January until mid-May sees the best weather, and often the best diving conditions. The days are mostly sunny at this time of year, and the sea sometimes flat enough to reflect the clouds. The monsoon usually hits around late May, lasting until the end of July, and is probably the worst time to visit the islands – strong winds, frequent rain and low visibility underwater. August through November some occasional showers and slightly rougher seas are possible but diving can still be great at this time of year. The weather often takes a turn for the worse for the month of December through early January.
 
Andaman and Nicobar are a vast archipelago, and aside from some erratic, infrequent and expensive helicopter shuttles and a pricy seaplane service to Havelock Island, passenger ferries are the only way to get between the islands. There is also the Infiniti Liveaboard that makes trips to destinations such as Cinque, Barren, Narcondam and other islands.All passenger transport in the islands is handled by the government-run Directorate of Shipping Services (DSS), which also runs the ferries back to the mainland. The DSS operates basically two kinds of vessels: small "tourist" ferries, and larger "local" ferries. Despite the names, fares are more or less identical on both, at Rs.150-200 one way from Port Blair to Havelock Island.
 
 
Tourist ferries seat about 100 people in padded bucket seats in a notionally air-conditioned cabin (which can still get sweltering hot). While you can access the top deck, there are no seats, shade or shelter outside. These boats are fast(er) and seaworthy, but top-heavy, and sway quite a bit in high seas. There is no canteen on board, so bring snacks or at least drinks.Local ferries are considerably larger, seating up to 400 in two levels: padded "bunk" or "luxury" seating upstairs, and plain old benches on the "deck" downstairs. Neither class is air-conditioned, but ocean breezes keep temperatures tolerable, and a canteen dishes out chai, samosas and bottled water. Due to their larger size, they're more stable in heavy seas, but take about twice as long as tourist ferries to get anywhere.
 
There's a new a/c catamaran ferry from Port Blair to Havelock. Tickets are 650, 750 or 1000 (which gets you a leather seat and your own tv) and can be booked from a dedicated ticket booking window at Port Blair, thus avoiding the queue barging, and through your guesthouse (or wild orchid, emerald gecko & andaman bubbles) on Havelock.In high season demand often exceeds supply, so book your tickets at least one day in advance, either through a travel agent or directly at Port Blair's harbour. Ferry ticket booking has now been computerised. This means you can book any ferry from any jetty - i.e. Rangat to Havelock from the Diglipur ferry jetty. This obviously depends on the computers working! Services may be changed or cancelled at short notice due to inclement weather, notably cyclones in the Bay of Bengal. If you're prone to sea-sickness, pop a pill an hour before you get on board.

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